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Where They Affect the Game: Delon Wright

Delon Wright will not win the Pac-12 Player of the Year award. His team is too far down the standings, his stats not quite adding up to those of a few others. But he’s most certainly in the conversation. He’s terrific – as I’m about to explain – and the conversation that I want to have regarding his POY candidacy is less _OY and more VP. As in valuable player.

What I like so much about Wright is – shocker from this blog – his ability to create shots at the rim. I examined Kyle Anderson’s ability to do such only to discover that Delon Wright is ridiculously good at it. My opening context will center around gross numbers. Wright has made 119 shots at the rim. Here’s the context:

RimBucketsWright has gotten 20 more baskets at the rim than any other player in the conference. Including Aaron Gordon. In the interest of full disclosure, I’m not positive if this is a true top 12 but it’s twelve names that I thought we would all agree were getting shots at the rim. This group averages about 56% of their shots at the rim and the D-1 average is 38.3%. Interestingly enough, for the vaunted frontcourt of Huestis, Powell, Brown and Nastic, not one Stanford Cardinal makes that list.

Revisiting the data from our Anderson study, Wright creates a shot at the rim on 62% of his possessions. That’s easily the best amongst the players I studied and easily contributes to the Utes’ gaudy 71.6% FG shooting at the rim (4th in the country) and 55.2% from inside the arc (9th in the country). Even more impressively, Wright gets half of his rim attempts in non-transition offense. By comparison, Jahii Carson gets just 35.1% of his rim shots in non-transition scenarios suggesting Wright just may be the better shot creator. Only 18.6% of his non-transition rim buckets are assisted (Carson’s is 28.6%). Is this a good thing? I’d assume so considering Utah has a propensity for late offense. They have the 266th longest possessions in America (18.8 seconds).

Now as a trained scientist, or at least someone with a degree in Human Biology, I’m aware of variables within an investigation. You want just one and so it’s difficult for me to validate Wright’s impact by comparing to last year’s Utes. After all, the current Utes played only 40% of 2013’s minutes. And that was a team that ranked 213th in 2pt FG%. Variables be damned, it’s happening.

So enter Delon Wright and now the 2014 Utes rank ninth in the country in 2pt FG%. They’re 25th in eFG% and I can’t rank it but their true shot percentage is 9% better than the D-1 average. Like I said, there are multiple variables, but the Utes’ offense is vastly improved from inside the arc and amongst their six top contributors, Wright is the only newbie. Perhaps there is only one variable.

Wright isn’t about to win the Pac-12’s POY award, but it just might be such that he’s the most valuable.

  • Brent

    as a Ute fan, I can say that watching Delon Wright this year has been a treat. We’re about .500 in Pac12 play. But Delon Wright has nearly every night been the best player on the floor. If he could improve his jumper in the off-season he would have a chance to crack the 1st round in the NBA draft. Great passer, great rebounder, blocks shots, gets steals, and averages at least 2-3 “Holy Cow” kind of plays per game. Plus, by all accounts he’s been a model citizen and team leader. One of my favorite Utes in the past 15 years.

    • awbutler25

      Great insights, Brent. I loved watching him atop the zone against Arizona. I know Jim Boeheim was tearing his jacket off in joy at how great he was getting into lanes and covering space. He’s terrific and while I hate to say how excited I am about next season with so much of 2014 remaining, look out for those 14-15 Utes.

  • AZUOFUUTE1

    OUTSTANDING ARTICLE!

    GO UTES!

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